Levitating On Meshes

Hi developers, I’ve recently come across a problem that many of you probably already know about, levitating on a mesh. I’ve tried looking at other posts, but I still found it unclear on how I can do this. Any help is appreciated. : )

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Is collisionFidelity set to box ?

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Yes it is, do I need to change it?

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Of course, set it to default (I believe, since I don’t use meshes)

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That didn’t do anything, it’s still blocking me.

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I believe it’s because of the mesh itself, but, like I said, can’t help more, I rarely use meshes.

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It is a mesh part right? Not a special mesh inside a part?

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It’s just a mesh if that’s what you’re asking.

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What do you mean mesh? Give me a picture of the “mesh” in the explorer window. That way I know clearly what you are talking about.

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Oh, it is a mesh part.

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Hmm, the levitation still occurs?
If so, it’s probably from the actual mesh geometry itself, not Roblox.

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Do you have any ideas on what I should do?

Do you have any ideas on what I should do?

I don’t have the best idea ever, but this could work depending on what the mesh is used for.
You could have the mesh with CanCollide disabled and have some simple invisible parts welded to it.

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It’s because the mesh has too little triangles, therefore roblox’s bounding boxes(collision) will not form a correct mesh, and take a shortcut, causing it to appear like ur floating. What I would do is make the mesh can collide off, then take parts and shape them to where you want collision. Or you could add a subdivide modifier, and subdivide the mesh.

@LaAerooo while adding more geometry is useful to getting more accurate collision boxes, I wouldn’t recommend adding potentially hundreds of tris just to achieve more accurate collisions since that’s very destructive to the object’s final shape.

For instance, I tried this in Studio just now:

The high poly mesh is obviously more accurate in all sizes, but it’s also hardly recognizable to the original shape, and using it for something, like say, a hard surface model would look weird unless that’s specifically the style you’re going for.

Basically, it’s usually best to use a collision underlay of Parts in the majority of real use cases.


Back to OP @Sxnders,

The collision box (what you’re calling “levitating”) is explained very well here:


Additionally, since you replied to the thread I linked (that had the correct answer), please read the thread solution before making a duplicate thread of the same issue. It’s a collision box, and typically the best solution is to make a collision box out of Parts with a transparency set to 1 (invisible) in the mesh’s space.

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Has to do with the complex convex/concave shapes on your mesh, one easy workaround would be to have a more basic invisible mesh/ multiple invisible parts work as the collider and turn collision off for the complex mesh.