Writing clean code - A complete guide

Writing clean code


Introduction

I see a lot of people writing messy code in their scripts, whether it’s a free model, a YouTube tutorial or a post here on the developer forum. Now, it may not seem that important to you, but I think it’s what shifts programming from a logical process, to an art. It also makes your scripts much more readable especially when your trying to debug a problem.

In this tutorial, I will be showing you how to write clean code, and improve your scripts aesthetics and readability.


What is covered

  • Indentation
  • Variable/Function names
  • Organizing code
  • Spacing
  • Operator spacing
  • Functions and modules
  • Comments

How to write cleaner code

Before I start showing how I write cleaner code, I want to say that everyone’s “style” is different. In the end, you have to create your own way of writing code in the best way that works for you.

Indentation

First let’s talk about indentation. Now, most modern code editors do this automatically, but sometimes they don’t always do it correctly (though it’s rare for a modern editor to make a mistake). Anytime you need to see when a block of code starts and ends, you should always use one TAB or about 8 spaces. This will make it easier to see what code that block holds or debugging a simple problems such as missing closing parenthesis.

Take a look at this example. There are two versions of the same code. One clean and one messy. For the messy version I want you to find the problem without running the code to get an error message. Only use what you have here.

Messy code
local part=workspace.Part
part.Touched:Connect(function(h)
if h.Parent:FindFirstChild("Humanoid") then
if h.Parent.Humanoid.WalkSpeed>16 then
h.Parent.Humanoid.WalkSpeed=16
end
end)

Now there are more than one issue here (in terms of writing clean code) but just focus on the what will give you an error.

Did you find it? Even if you did, try looking at this one to see the difference:

Clean code
local part = workspace.Part

part.Touched:Connect(function(hit)
	if hit.Parent:FindFirstChild("Humanoid") then
		if hit.Parent.Humanoid.WalkSpeed > 16 then
			hit.Parent.Humanoid.WalkSpeed = 16
		end
end)

Now the solution to this is quite simple the code is missing an end, but with more complex problems, your code being clean and readable is going to become more and more important.


Naming variables and functions

Variable names are very important when you have not looked at a script in a while and you have to change something. Let’s say you made a variable for how fast a part would move. You probably should call it speed. Some people would call speed s or spd. This makes it hard to figure out what is going on even if you wrote it (especially when you have a large script with hundreds of variables). Always be as descriptive as you can with your variables.

Function names should let the programmer know what the function does before reading the code contained in it. A function that smoothly changes a value from a to b is called lerp (or linear interpolation). It wouldn’t be called L or LI. That could mean anything, L could be luck(), LI could be lineImpact(). The point is, you shouldn’t have to think about what the name stands for.


Organizing your code

This is something I do in all my scripts. I group specific parts of code together so I know what is what. For example, when I declare variables, all my services (DataStoreService, UserInputService, etc…) go at the top of the script. Next comes anything that holds an instance as a value, and finally, everything else, though those variables are grouped as well its just different for each script (you decide how those are grouped). I usually group them by type. Strings are grouped with any other string variable, numbers/floats are grouped with their type, etc (I usually group unassigned variables after assigned ones).

Variables within functions should be ordered the same as you order your global variables. This is to keep it consistent with the rest of your code. If your not sure what I mean by grouping, it is just a space between each group. Treat each function as a group meaning there is a space after the end statement and the declaration of the next function or statement. Example:

Code
-- Group 1 (services)
local players = game:GetService("Players")
local runService = game:GetService("RunService")

-- Group 2 (instances)
local baseplate = workspace:FindFirstChild("Baseplate")
local model = workspace:FindFirstChild("Model 1")

-- Group 3 (integers)
local x = 1
local y = 2
local z = 3

-- Group 4 (nil/null/unassigned)
local one
local two
local three

For functions, they should be declared after all the global variables (can be accessed from any part of the script) but are still ordered. You should order your functions in such a way that if another function needs to invoke another function, it can. (without removing the local tag). Let’s say function x() needs to invoke function y(). Function x() should be below function y() so it can be invoked without problems. This means you can put local before all your functions! Example:

Code
--  services

-- variables

local function y()
    -- code
end

local function x()
    y() -- can call function y()
end

x()

When you want to invoke a function using events, I recommend you place those at the bottom of your script. I do this so that all my events are all in one place and all the functions are declared already.

An example of all these things would be my DataStore script I use is most of my unreleased projects. Don’t worry if you understand it or not just take a look at how things are organized:

DataStoreCode
local players = game:GetService("Players")
local dataStoreService = game:GetService("DataStoreService")
local dataStore = dataStoreService:GetDataStore("GameSaveV0.1a")

local tries = 3

local dataLoaded
local loadedData
local starterCash

-- Gets called/invoked from Get(plr)
local function Set(plr)
	if dataLoaded then
    -- This group is for data store related things
		local key = "userCode-#plr" .. plr.UserId
		local data = {
			["Cash"] = starterCash,
			["Level"] = 0,
			["XP"] = 0
		}
		
       -- This group is used for securing the data
		local count = 0
		local success, err
		
		repeat
			success, err = pcall(function()
				dataStore:SetAsync(key, data)
			end)
			
			count = count + 1
		until success or count >= tries
		
		if not success then
			warn("Failed to set data. Error code: " .. tostring(err))
			
			return
		end
	else
		warn("Data has not been loaded. Please wait for data to be loaded. Plr name" .. plr.Name)
		
		return
	end
end

-- Gets invoked from CreateLeaderstats(plr) (grouping is the same as Set())
local function Get(plr)
	local key = "userCode-#plr" .. plr.UserId
	
	local count = 0
	local success, err
	
	repeat
		success, err = pcall(function()
			loadedData = dataStore:GetAsync(key)
		end)
		
		count = count + 1
	until success or count >= tries
	
	if not success then
		warn("Failed to read data. Error code: " .. tostring(err))
		
		plr:Kick("Failed to load data, please rejoin.")
		
		return
	end
	
	if success then
		if loadedData then
			dataLoaded = true
			
			return loadedData
		else
			dataLoaded = true
			
			return {
				["Cash"] = starterCash,
				["Level"] = 0,
				["XP"] = 0
			}
		end
	end
end

local function CreateLeaderstats(plr)
    local data = Get(plr)

	local leaderstats = Instance.new("Folder")
	leaderstats.Name = "leaderstats"
	leaderstats.Parent = plr

	local cash = Instance.new("IntValue")
	cash.Name = "Cash"
	cash.Parent = plr
	
	local level = Instance.new("IntValue")
	level.Name = "Level"
	level.Parent = leaderstats
	
	local xp = Instance.new("IntValue")
	xp.Name = "XP"
	xp.Parent = plr
	
	cash .Value = data.Cash 
	level.Value = data.Level
	xp.Value = data.XP
end

-- Event calls are all at the bottom (as well as a BindToClose() call)
players.PlayerAdded:Connect(CreateLeaderstats)
players.PlayerRemoving:Connect(Set)

game:BindToClose(function()
	for i, v in next, players:GetChildren() do
		if v then
			Set(v)
		end
	end
end)

Spacing

Spacing also helps make the entire script overall just seem a bit cleaner. Lets decode my Set() function in terms of spacing to help understand this.

Set() function
-- Gets called/invoked from Get(plr)
local function Set(plr)
	if dataLoaded then
    -- This group is for data store related things
		local key = "userCode-#plr" .. plr.UserId
		local data = {
			["Cash"] = starterCash,
			["Level"] = 0,
			["XP"] = 0
		}
		
       -- This group is used for securing the data
		local count = 0
		local success, err
		
		repeat
			success, err = pcall(function()
				dataStore:SetAsync(key, data)
			end)
			
			count = count + 1
		until success or count >= tries
		
		if not success then
			warn("Failed to set data. Error code: " .. tostring(err))
			
			return
		end
	else
		warn("Data has not been loaded. Please wait for data to be loaded. Plr name" .. plr.Name)
		
		return
	end
end

For me, I add a space after every end statement that isn’t above another end statement. I also add spaces between returns and the previous statement. Something that isn’t here is I always put spaces between wait() functions, so it’s easier to see where the script pauses. The goal is not to have a space between every line, but to have enough spaces it improves the readability.


Operator spacing

Operator spacing is when you use spaces on operators such as *, +, -, /, and more. First off, when you declare a variable, you should space the = (equal sign) from the variable. This also goes for == (is equal to). This will look like this local x = 1 instead of local x=1. Similarly you should do the same with ==. So we write
if x == 1 then instead of if x==1 then. The same thing applies to less than (<) and greater than signs (>). Now, this next one is not a must. When it comes to mathematical operators and the concatenation operator I have seen some say spacing is less readable than not. Personally I space my operators, but for this, you should choose what looks best to you. I have an example below that shows the difference.

Code
local x = 1
local y = 2

x + y
x+y

x - y
x-y

x * y
x*y

x / y
x/y

x % y
x%y

x ^ y
x^y

local string1 = "s"
local string2 = "h"

string1 .. string2
string1..string2

Functions and modules

Functions and modules are a big problem when it comes to writing clean code. This is because each function should only handle one thing. It’s so easy to get lazy and not create another function yielding the contents of three functions in one. The same thing is for modules (but not as extreme). A module should only have the functions for what it is supposed to do. If you’re making a datastore module, you should only include the functions for receiving and setting data. If you find yourself doing more than one thing per function, try moving that code into a separate function to handle that code.


Comments

Comments is one of the most simple ways to make code more readable. Don’t over use them, but use enough that if you don’t remember what your code does, you can see where certain processes occur. I am awful at this and I cannot say how many times I have come back to code and have no idea what it does. Trust me, comment, comment, comment…

Now take a look at my placement module (parts of it) with and without comments.

No comments

local function editFloor(f)
	if enableFloors and not stackable then
		if f == 1  then
			posY = posY + floor(abs(floorStep))
		else
			posY = posY - floor(abs(floorStep))
		end
	end
end

local function calculateItemLocation()
	x, z = mouse.Hit.X, mouse.Hit.Z
	
	if moveByGrid then
		if x % grid < grid / 2 then
			posX = round(x - (x % grid))
		else
			posX = round(x + (grid - (x % grid)))
		end
		
		if z % grid < grid / 2 then
			posZ = round(z - (z % grid))
		else
			posZ = round(z + (grid - (z % grid)))
		end
		
		if currentRot then
			cx = primary.Size.X / 2
			cz = primary.Size.Z / 2
		else
			cx = primary.Size.Z / 2
			cz = primary.Size.X / 2
		end
	else
		posX = x
		posZ = z
	end
	
	if stackable and mouse.Target then
		posY = calculateYPos(mouse.Target.Position.Y, mouse.Target.Size.Y, primary.Size.Y)
	end

	posY = clamp(posY, initialY, maxHeight + initialY)
	
	bounds()
end

local function getFinalCFrame()
	return cframe(posX, posY, posZ) * cframe(cx, 0, cz) * anglesXYZ(0, rot * pi / 180, 0)
end

local function translateObj()
	if currentState ~= 4 then
		calculateItemLocation()
		checkHitbox()
		editHitboxColor()
		
		object:SetPrimaryPartCFrame(primary.CFrame:Lerp(cframe(posX, posY, posZ) * cframe(cx, 0, cz) * anglesXYZ(0, rot * pi / 180, 0), speed))
	end
end

local function coolDown(plr, cd)
	if lastPlacement[plr.UserId] == nil then
		lastPlacement[plr.UserId] = os.time()
		
		return true
	else
		if os.time() - lastPlacement[plr.UserId] >= cd then
			lastPlacement[plr.UserId] = os.time()
			
			return true
		else
			return false
		end
	end
end

function placement:terminate()
	stackable = nil
	canPlace = nil
	smartRot = nil
	
	object:Destroy()
	object = nil
	
	if displayGridTexture then
		for i, v in next, plot:GetChildren() do
			if v then
				if v.Name == "GridTexture" and v:IsA("Texture") then
					v:Destroy()
				end
			end
		end
	end
	
	setCurrentState(4)
	canActivate = true
	
	return
end

function placement:requestPlacement(func)
	if currentState ~= 4 or currentState ~= 3 and object then
		local cf
		
		calculateItemLocation()
		
		if coolDown(player, placementCooldown) then
			if buildModePlacement then
				cf = getFinalCFrame()
				
				checkHitbox()
				setCurrentState(2)
				
				if currentState == 2 then
					func:InvokeServer(object.Name, placedObjects, loc, cf, collisions)
					
					setCurrentState(1)
				end
			else
				cf = getFinalCFrame()
				
				checkHitbox()
				setCurrentState(2)
				
				if currentState == 2 then
					if func:InvokeServer(object.Name, placedObjects, loc, cf, collisions) then
						placement:terminate()
					end
				end
			end
		end
	end
end

function placement:activate(id, pobj, plt, stk, r)
	if object then
		object:Destroy()
		object = nil
	end
	
	plot = plt
	object = itemLocation:FindFirstChild(tostring(id))
	placedObjects = pobj
	loc = itemLocation
	
	approveActivation()
	
	object = itemLocation:FindFirstChild(id):Clone()
	
	for i, o in next, object:GetDescendants() do
		if o then
			if o:IsA("Part") or o:IsA("UnionOperation") or o:IsA("MeshPart") then
				o.CanCollide = false
				
				if transparentModel then
					o.Transparency = o.Transparency + transparencyDelta
				end
			end
		end
	end
	
	object.PrimaryPart.Transparency = hitboxTransparency
	
	stackable = stk
	smartRot = r
	
	if not stk then
		mouse.TargetFilter = placedObjects
	else
		mouse.TargetFilter = object
	end
	
	if buildModePlacement then
		canActivate = true
	else
		canActivate = false
	end
	
	initialY = calculateYPos(plt.Position.Y, plt.Size.Y, object.PrimaryPart.Size.Y)
	posY = initialY
	
	speed = 0
	rot = 0
	currentRot = true
	
	translateObj()
	displayGrid()
	editHitboxColor()
	
	if interpolation then
		speed = clamp(abs(tonumber(1 - lerpSpeed)), 0, 0.9)
	else
		speed = 1
	end
	
	primary = object.PrimaryPart
	object.Parent = pobj
	
	setCurrentState(1)
end

runService:BindToRenderStep("Input", Enum.RenderPriority.Input.Value, translateObj)
userInputService.InputBegan:Connect(getInput)

return placement
Commented
local placement = {}

placement.__index = placement

-- switches the floor depending on the value given
local function editFloor(f)
	if enableFloors and not stackable then
		if f == 1  then
			posY = posY + floor(abs(floorStep))
		else
			posY = posY - floor(abs(floorStep))
		end
	end
end

-- Calculates the Y position to be ontop of the plot (all objects) and any object (when stacking)
local function calculateYPos(tp, ts, o)
	return (tp + ts / 2) + o / 2
end

-- Calculates the position of the object
local function calculateItemLocation()
	x, z = mouse.Hit.X, mouse.Hit.Z
	
	if moveByGrid then
		-- Snaps models to grid
		if x % grid < grid / 2 then
			posX = round(x - (x % grid))
		else
			posX = round(x + (grid - (x % grid)))
		end
		
		if z % grid < grid / 2 then
			posZ = round(z - (z % grid))
		else
			posZ = round(z + (grid - (z % grid)))
		end
		
		-- Handles giving proper offset when rotated
		if currentRot then
			cx = primary.Size.X / 2
			cz = primary.Size.Z / 2
		else
			cx = primary.Size.Z / 2
			cz = primary.Size.X / 2
		end
	else
		posX = x
		posZ = z
	end
	
	-- Changes posY depending on mouse target
	if stackable and mouse.Target then
		posY = calculateYPos(mouse.Target.Position.Y, mouse.Target.Size.Y, primary.Size.Y)
	end
	
	-- Clamps posY to a max height above the plot position
	posY = clamp(posY, initialY, maxHeight + initialY)
	
	-- Invokes bounds
	bounds()
end

--[[
	Used for sending a final CFrame to the server when using interpolation.
	When interpolating the position is changing. This is the position the object will
	end up after the lerp is finished.
]]
local function getFinalCFrame()
	return cframe(posX, posY, posZ) * cframe(cx, 0, cz) * anglesXYZ(0, rot * pi / 180, 0)
end

-- Sets the position of the object
local function translateObj()
	if currentState ~= 4 then
		calculateItemLocation()
		checkHitbox()
		editHitboxColor()
		
		object:SetPrimaryPartCFrame(primary.CFrame:Lerp(cframe(posX, posY, posZ) * cframe(cx, 0, cz) * anglesXYZ(0, rot * pi / 180, 0), speed))
	end
end

-- Makes sure that you cannot place objects too fast.
local function coolDown(plr, cd)
	if lastPlacement[plr.UserId] == nil then
		lastPlacement[plr.UserId] = os.time()
		
		return true
	else
		if os.time() - lastPlacement[plr.UserId] >= cd then
			lastPlacement[plr.UserId] = os.time()
			
			return true
		else
			return false
		end
	end
end

-- Verifys that the plane which the object is going to be placed upon is the correct size
local function verifyPlane()	
	if plot.Size.X % grid == 0 and plot.Size.Z % grid == 0 then
		return true
	else
		return false
	end
end

-- Checks if there are any problems with the users setup
local function approveActivation()
	if not verifyPlane() then
		warn("The object that the model is moving on is not scaled correctly. Consider changing it.")
	end
	
	if grid > min(plot.Size.X, plot.Size.Z) then 
		error("Grid size is larger than the plot size. To fix this, try lowering the grid size.")
	end
end

-- Constructor function
function placement.new(g, objs, r, t, u, l)
	local data = {}
	local metaData = setmetatable(data, placement)
	
	-- Sets variables needed
	grid = abs(tonumber(g))
	itemLocation = objs
	rotateKey = r
	terminateKey = t
	raiseKey = u
	lowerKey = l
	
	data.gridsize = grid
	data.items = objs
	data.rotate = rotateKey
	data.cancel = terminateKey
	data.raise = raiseKey
	data.lower = lowerKey
	
	return data 
end

-- Terminates placement
function placement:terminate()
	-- resets variables
	stackable = nil
	canPlace = nil
	smartRot = nil
	
	object:Destroy()
	object = nil
	
	-- removes grid texture from plot
	if displayGridTexture then
		for i, v in next, plot:GetChildren() do
			if v then
				if v.Name == "GridTexture" and v:IsA("Texture") then
					v:Destroy()
				end
			end
		end
	end
	
	setCurrentState(4)
	canActivate = true
	
	return
end

-- Requests to place down the object
function placement:requestPlacement(func)
	if currentState ~= 4 or currentState ~= 3 and object then
		local cf
		
		calculateItemLocation()
		
		-- Makes sure you have waited the cooldown period before placing
		if coolDown(player, placementCooldown) then
			-- Buildmode placement is when you can place multiple objects in one session
			if buildModePlacement then
				cf = getFinalCFrame()
				
				checkHitbox()
				setCurrentState(2)
				
				-- Sends information to the server, so the object can be placed
				if currentState == 2 then
					func:InvokeServer(object.Name, placedObjects, loc, cf, collisions)
					
					setCurrentState(1)
				end
			else
				cf = getFinalCFrame()
				
				checkHitbox()
				setCurrentState(2)
				
				if currentState == 2 then
					-- Same as above (line 464)
					if func:InvokeServer(object.Name, placedObjects, loc, cf, collisions) then
						placement:terminate()
					end
				end
			end
		end
	end
end

-- Activates placement
function placement:activate(id, pobj, plt, stk, r)
	if object then
		object:Destroy()
		object = nil
	end
	
	-- Sets necessary variables for placement 
	plot = plt
	object = itemLocation:FindFirstChild(tostring(id))
	placedObjects = pobj
	loc = itemLocation
	
	approveActivation()
	
	object = itemLocation:FindFirstChild(id):Clone()
	
	-- Sets properties of the model (CanCollide, Transparency)
	for i, o in next, object:GetDescendants() do
		if o then
			if o:IsA("Part") or o:IsA("UnionOperation") or o:IsA("MeshPart") then
				o.CanCollide = false
				
				if transparentModel then
					o.Transparency = o.Transparency + transparencyDelta
				end
			end
		end
	end
	
	object.PrimaryPart.Transparency = hitboxTransparency
	
	stackable = stk
	smartRot = r
	
	-- Allows stackable objects depending on stk variable given by the user
	if not stk then
		mouse.TargetFilter = placedObjects
	else
		mouse.TargetFilter = object
	end
	
	-- Toggles buildmode placement (infinite placement) depending on if set true by the user
	if buildModePlacement then
		canActivate = true
	else
		canActivate = false
	end
	
	-- Gets the initial y pos and gives it to posY
	initialY = calculateYPos(plt.Position.Y, plt.Size.Y, object.PrimaryPart.Size.Y)
	posY = initialY
	
	speed = 0
	rot = 0
	currentRot = true
	
	translateObj()
	displayGrid()
	editHitboxColor()
	
	-- Sets up interpolation speed
	if interpolation then
		speed = clamp(abs(tonumber(1 - lerpSpeed)), 0, 0.9)
	else
		speed = 1
	end
	
	-- Parents the object to the location given
	primary = object.PrimaryPart
	object.Parent = pobj
	
	setCurrentState(1)
end

-- Just basic invokes
runService:BindToRenderStep("Input", Enum.RenderPriority.Input.Value, translateObj)
userInputService.InputBegan:Connect(getInput)

return placement

Conclusion

Now just because I say one thing is better than another doesn’t mean it is. If you disagree with something in this tutorial, just change it for what fits your code style. You can create your own style that is easy to read for you. Really, the only thing that is crucial, is naming functions and variables properly.

Hope you enjoyed this tutorial! Comment your thoughts on it to give feedback on it!

63 Likes

This is a great tutorial for newer developers! I once wrote in messy code and it took me forever to sort it out! Good job :star_struck:

4 Likes

I absolutely agree with basically every statement in this. Good job!

3 Likes

Nice guide, just wanted to comment on this

There are a couple of reasons for not adding spaces between mathematical operators. Part of it is because for long expressions, it helps to avoid horizontal scrolling by keeping the line short enough. Some people often have their own writing habits in mathematics - for example, a multiplication on a bracket like 5(3) is implied without a multiplication symbol; adding the symbol * already strays from common notation, and the space on top of that between each character takes more time to process for some people.

There are cases where people write 5 -3 to distinguish the numbers are separate, often that is more helpful. For multiplication, division, exponents, etc… these operations are normally written right next to their members, so it is more comfortable to read that way as well. Addition and subtraction usually are written with spaces, as are equal signs like you mentioned.

1 Like

May I just state don’t overuse gaps like you did in your example, I’d rather read code with no gaps then one with gaps virtually every line, it’s just an eyesore.

2 Likes

I’d just like to point out the most helpful thing in terms of readability: comments. Putting comments around a long script makes it much more readable and organized. You’ll know what part of the script does what! I recommend you put this in your tutorial here.

3 Likes

I have a friend that literally codes like this:

function finddescendant(item, name)
for i,v in pairs(item:GetDescendants()) do
if v.Name == name then
return v
end
end
end

This is a pretty solid tutorial. I’ll make sure to school him with this. Thanks.

4 Likes

Personally I find comments only achieve the opposite effects in most cases, However minimal comments does help with making the code look organised.

I personally only really use comments for splitting the variables I define at the begging of my scripts / where applicable documentation of the functions (All included at the origin of the code)

I would rarely add a comment into may actual code if there is something I need to add / change which im likely to forget about, since this bumps my memory.

While adding comments for every few lines of code can help others understand whats the code is doing, I personally find it makes it a complete mess to read and work with.

1 Like

I added a category just for this now. I can’t believe I forgot about them!!

Great section, but I think it lacks examples. Give an example of a long and complicated script with and without comments, so people can compare them side by side.

Yeah I am actually doing that now. Ok thats added.

image

1 Like

Yeah I can see that, though I see people say that spacing it out is better. That is why I said

2 Likes

I do agree with this tutorial, although I will sometimes not put spaces in math equations to keep things a bit organized

local hypotenuse = math.sqrt(opposite^2 + side^2)

I might also use them in places where it’s a bit cleaner without a space

array[#array+1] = Value

Also, regarding comments. I’ll normally not put comments that often, since the function name is self explanitory in my code (in most cases)

local function setupPlayer(player)
    -- setup stuff
    print("Loaded" .. Player.Name)
end

Again, this is just my opinion (everyone has a different style of writing code, and that’s perfectly fine).

1 Like

For anyone interested, you should also take a look at the Lua Style guide used internally at Roblox:

https://roblox.github.io/lua-style-guide/

It also outlines many of the best practices to be used and fills in gaps not quite covered by this tutorial.

6 Likes

Thank you so much. My code really needed this. Now other people or my future self will actually be able to read it easily!

2 Likes

lol

local part = workspace.Part

local function onTouched(hit)
	local model = hit.Parent
	local humanoid = model and model:FindFirstChildOfClass("Humanoid")
	
	if humanoid and humanoid.WalkSpeed > 16 then
		humanoid.WalkSpeed = 16
	end
end

part.Touched:Connect(onTouched)
17 Likes

Just to note, there is a plugin that helps clean your code with 2 tools:
minifier which makes your code as small as possible
beautifier which makes your code clean

here is the plugin: Minify and Beautify

Remember to use the correct tool, once you beautify a script, the beautified version should be inside the original one.

I think the missing end is intentional to prove the point that indenting makes it easier to identify issues in code compared to non-indented code.

Oh I see, my bad then, I’ll edit it out.